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Radar

A Cut Above: 5 Talented Editors to Have on Your Radar

Bi-coastal creative editorial boutique jumP reveals the rising stars you need to know about

A Cut Above: 5 Talented Editors to Have on Your Radar

jumP is an award-winning creative editorial boutique operating across New York and Los Angeles. The team brings its explosive talent to a wide range of directors, agencies and top tier brands, including Apple, YouTube, Cadillac, Maybelline, McDonald’s, and Nike. Equipped with over two decades of experience, jumP continuously delivers powerful, emotional, and visually inventive results to commercials, features, short films, music videos, and emerging media content alike. Since its inception, the boutique company has invested in nurturing promising young stars. Here, the jumP family introduces its exciting roster of rising talent…

Kristin Yawata

Q> What first attracted you to editing? How did you get here?

Kristin> Growing up in Southern California, I was interested in filmmaking from a young age. I knew very early that I wanted to explore storytelling as a career. I studied Film and Digital Media at college and found myself gravitating towards editorial, where the entire process comes together and the story, tone, and vision really take shape.

Q> What do you enjoy most about the process?

Kristin> I see myself as an eternal student and thrive where no one day is the same. Every project brings new challenges and things to learn. I love that the tools and medium are always evolving and the ways to tell stories can grow with it.

Q> How would you describe your personal style of editing and where do you draw your inspirations from?

Kristin> I love working on projects that centre around people. I find it very rewarding to shape stories that highlight strong and passionate women and love to use editing to hone in on the strength in their vulnerability. Working with Luna Bars and The New Yorker allowed me to participate in projects that told these stories and focused on empowering women.

Q> Which project are you most proud of and why?

Kristin> My favourite project is a short film for The New Yorker that features Insecure’s Issa Rae pitching a ‘90210’ for black kids. It was an absolute joy to cut Issa Rae’s masterful mix of comedy and social commentary.


Erwin Fraterman

Q> What first attracted you to editing? How did you get here?

Erwin> I had my first brush with editing when I was about eight years old. A good friend of mine and I started shooting videos that I would cut together in Windows Movie Maker. Throughout the years, I found myself more interested in editing than any other aspect of filmmaking. My dad, who is a world-class photographer, exposed me to the advertising world at a very young age. After studying Arts & Sciences in The Netherlands; I emigrated to the United States to pursue my passion for editing at the highest level. I joined jumP as an intern and have since worked my way through the ranks to Editor.

Q> What do you enjoy most about the process?

Erwin> I have always enjoyed the creativity that comes with the editing process and I thrive on solving challenges. Watching every second of footage and coming up with the best possible way to tell the story is something I greatly enjoy.

Q> How would you describe your personal style of editing and what inspires you?

Erwin> Editing for me has been instinctually about finding the flow of the piece. I want to capture the viewer in the first couple seconds and keep them engaged until the end. To me, it’s deeply meaningful to work on something that provokes an emotional reaction from its audience. For inspiration, I love travelling to new and exciting places to experience different cultures. Locally, I am always trying to find new restaurants in town or seeking a unique experience within LA.

Q> Which project are you most proud of and why?

Erwin> Recently, YouTube Music’s ‘Open the World of Music’ was a standout project. Not only was it a really fun project to work on, but the agency and director also gave us a lot of creative freedom so we were able to play with the footage and come up with a distinct way to tell that particular story. As an audience, we are inundated with advertisements on a daily basis, so it’s important to me to create something that hasn’t been done before and find an innovative way to tell a familiar story. This experience lent itself to just that. It also doesn’t hurt that it was scored with a Beatles and Gary Clark soundtrack!


Troy Mercury

Q> What first attracted you to editing? How did you get here?

Troy> I had my first foray into the world of film after graduating college, when I bought a Panasonic Mini-DV camcorder on a lark to document a nation-wide music tour I was on. I was immediately hooked - trying to stitch together these little snippets into a compelling story. On one level, it was frustrating because I had very little technical knowledge, but on another more emotional level, it was magical seeing it all come together.

Shortly thereafter, I began my career as an apprentice at jumP and under the tutelage of [partners and editors] Michael Saia and Luis Moreno, I worked my way up to creative editor.

Q> What do you enjoy most about the process?

Troy> The feeling you get on a new project after you’ve just watched the dailies: when you open that first empty timeline and it’s just staring back you. I’ve been doing this for a decent amount of time, but I still find it so terrifying yet exciting - the endless creative possibilities, the (sometimes horrifying and sometimes delightful) hidden surprises, and not necessarily knowing where the finish line is going to be. It’s a reminder that the passion to be doing this is still definitely there.

I also love meeting and collaborating with other creative people. When you break the process down to its most basic form - creative people making cool shit with technology - it really is a privilege. I’m always amazed how much great work can get done by a small team of dedicated, extremely talented people.

Q> How would you describe your personal style of editing and what inspires you?

Troy> I think my personal style is influenced by my early encounters with film growing up in the late '80s and early '90s. My two older brothers loved cheesy action flicks while my mother loved heartfelt, international films (think Bloodsport meets Il Postino), so I ended up developing an appreciation for a broad range of films. I think this exposure has made me a very open and collaborative editor. I will listen and try anything to see if it has an interesting outcome.

Like many, I draw inspiration from travel. Interacting with different people, landscapes, foods and cultures is essential for broadening your horizons. Seeing how other cultures tell their stories and histories greatly informs my work. Whenever I sense that my creative batteries are running low, I often find myself in museums or galleries – living in New York, I’m spoilt for choice. Seeing how other artists (both past and present) working in completely different mediums dealt with expression and communication is really inspirational and I often find myself incorporating their ideas into my work. Some favourite museums include the Neka Museum (Indonesia), The Louisiana Museum (Denmark), Fotografiska Museum (Stockholm), and the Frick (NYC).

Q> Which project are you most proud of and why?

Troy> The 'Juvederm It' TV and social media campaign I recently cut for Allergan is something I am really proud of. I was involved early on in the process to help make the pitch videos with the creative team at DDB (Cheryl Horsfall, Stephanie McCartney) and we really pushed the envelope, especially for a pharmaceutical client. I was thrilled when it went into production and it was beautifully shot in LA with director Giovanni Messner from Brother TV and DP Todd Banhazi. There was such a wealth of phenomenal material it was an absolute joy to cut. It was such a collaborative effort all around and a prime example of the marvellous things that can happen when you have great creative and a willing client. To see the project from birth to completion was incredibly gratifying. Also, a special shout out to Dave Hussey at CO3 for an incredible colour correct.


Kadie Migliarese


Q> What first attracted you to editing? How did you get here?

Kadie> I studied music and initially moved to New York to work in audio post production. As it turns out, I got the opportunity to become an Assistant Editor and I quickly realised that I had both a passion and eye for editorial. Since then, jumP has been where I’ve thrived.

Q> What do you enjoy most about the process?

Kadie> Each edit presents a unique storytelling opportunity, so I love the challenge of shaping what that becomes. The story doesn’t always come easily but that extra challenge can sometimes be what makes the process so fun at the end of the day.

Q> How would you describe your personal style of editing and what inspires you?

Kadie> I like to have an opinion, to know my footage inside out, and to present a strong piece to my client from day one so they can relax. I want my clients to be able to sit in my room with the knowledge that there’s a mutual confidence and trust, that together we’re going to create something excellent. It doesn’t matter how much I like something - if the clients aren’t just as happy about it, there’s work to be done.

I’m inspired by my peers here at jumP and in the industry. I’m especially inspired by other strong, passionate, and creative women in any industry!

Q> Which project are you most proud of and why?

Kadie> A short film for T Magazine, The New York Times style magazine called ‘They Made It Here: The Golden Age of N.Y.C. Theatre’. At 12-minutes, this is the longest piece that I have edited to date. We are so used to having the challenge of telling a story in 30 or 60 seconds, so it was nice to get to open it up and tell a more fleshed-out story. So, I really wanted to do right by this because I felt that it was an important story for both the actors and editors (at T Mag) involved, reminiscing about such a great time in their lives. Featuring an all-star line-up including Willem Dafoe, Sarah Jessica Parker, Glenn Close, and Matthew Broderick, it took a lot of effort to organise such a unique day, which was basically a reunion for everyone. I wanted to make sure the story was told properly.


David Johnston

Q> What first attracted you to editing? How did you get here?

David> It was a happy coincidence that turned out to be the perfect fit! I arrived at jumP without an inkling of my interest for creative editorial but it became clear very quickly how well it aligns with my interests in photography, music, and audio production.

David> After studying French at college in my native Minnesota, I entered the Peace Corps - serving for 27 months in a rural village in Togo, West Africa. When I returned to the U.S., I was eager to find my next adventure and I left for New York with no plan. Three days after arriving in the city, I found myself at jumP interviewing for the client services position despite having no real understanding of editing. They must have seen some potential in me because I got the job - making jumP the first and only place I’ve ever worked in NYC. Since then, I have had great mentors throughout the process of getting to where I am today.

Q> What do you enjoy most about the process?

David> My favourite part is the last 10% of getting an edit built. Once all of the selecting and heavy lifting is done, you’re just polishing and it’s super fun. You can take something that has a strong editorial backbone and then bend it so many different ways. I feel like those final moments of building the edit are what make the work standout. All of the steps are important, but those final passes through really bring out my own personality and feeling.

Q> How would you describe your personal style of editing and what inspires you?

David> As an adventurer who loves to travel off the beaten path, I find inspiration in the beauty of nature. I like to think I bring this philosophy to the editing suite – I’m always looking to uphold the material’s artistic integrity while adding my own little twist.

Q> Which project are you most proud of and why?

David> I’m probably most proud of all of the work for the Tumi ‘Perfecting the Journey’ campaign. Each one of those nine films had such a different life and feel to them. It was an interesting challenge to work with different directors on each project and give each piece its own personality - you can learn so much from the people you work with. I really had to dig deep into the bag of tricks and learn some new ones along the way.

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