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The Influencers

What to Ask When You Take Your Content In-House

INFLUENCERS: Neil Lane and Lucie Loughlin debate what changes will add real value to a brand when it comes to in-house creative and production

What to Ask When You Take Your Content In-House

Increasing numbers of brands are beginning to take their production and creative in-house to create more content for less – particularly when it comes to digital content.

In March this year, ISBA reported that 62% of advertisers in the UK are looking to reduce the number of suppliers used and looking to move towards on-site and in-house solutions. Furthermore, just under half of brands in the UK now have, or are considering establishing, an on-site (45%) or in-house (44%) capability.

The report told us this is being driven by the need for closer collaboration, data confidentiality and as a means of easier comms – stating that 68% of brands were frustrated with how long it takes for agencies to deliver briefs or make decisions.

Whilst in-house capabilities are becoming an increasingly attractive proposition for brands, it’s not a decision to be taken lightly. There are many factors to consider to ensure / in ensuring the transition is a success.

Brands need to ask themselves:
●      What are the repercussions of going in-house?
●      Who do we really need to hire and where do we find that talent?
●      What are we trying to create? Can we make assets that can be used multiple times?
●      What needs external influence? Creative? Strategy? Planning?
●      How do we budget for this?
●      What does the ideal production partner look like?
●      What commercial business model do you implement?

The big question really is: What changes will bring real added value to our brand?

Every brand is different and not everything should be brought in-house. But how do you decide what remains external and who should be advising you? Today, it is so important to be able to answer these questions (amongst others) in full.

Are we able to do this at the same quality as an agency, for a smaller budget, or is the output and external viewpoint of an agency worth that extra investment?

A lot of the time digital content creation across all media can be taken in house – if it’s done in the right way, with the right intent and still in a collaborative manner with all agencies.  

At Jam we have three distinct areas to our company. We not only consult for brands about how this can be done, but we also have our own production offering: creating digital content and providing fast, quality versioning. We’ve spent our early careers honing commercial production for TV and the last three creating impactful digital content and bespoke versioning services.

The industry has never moved at a faster pace. If you’ve been out of digital marketing for as little as six months, the landscape will have completely changed.

To think a few years ago, Facebook Live was failing. Today, “live” content is a rapidly growing revenue stream for marketers and has been adopted on multiple digital channels. A year ago, Instagram and Facebook challenged Snapchat stories, with Instagram Stories triumphing over its rivals and becoming a common part of everyday social interaction.  

Speed to market, influencers channels, integration of content, customer journeys and data, data, data! As a brand, how can you keep on top of how to create content for all these new channels and revenue streams?

Everything moves so fast that no one can be a real expert in every new thing straight away. But those experienced few who are in the thick of it, who are creating things every day, adapting to new challenges in all things production – they will always be able to give you the most candid and honest advice on what you can get for your budget. They won’t shoehorn your needs into a process that doesn’t fit!

 

Neil Lane and Lucie Loughlin are co-founders of Jam